Full Moon Magic – An Acrostic Plus Poem


Forever and ever
Us witches pray
Lay your blessing on us
Let your wisdom guide us
Make us live in harmony
Once and forever
On this night we swear
Never to let evil near

Never be swayed by them
Who sees nature as an expendable cornucopia
We will protect her from harmful overusing
With one voice, together we say, I
am a proud defender of Gaia’s chaos systemic

© RedCat



Written for Poetics: For the love of puzzles . . . at dVerse. Where Lilian invents a new poetic form. An expansion of the Acrostic poem, she calls Acrostic Plus. I always loved puzzles of all kinds. So even though I find acrostic’s hard to write, they can easily be nonsensical, I had to give it a try.

Lillian writes: 

In an Acrostic poem, the first letter of each line, when read from top to bottom, will spell out a message or a name or a word.

In the Acrostic Plus, the first letter of each line in the first stanza, when read from top to bottom, spells out a message or word(s) and in the second stanza, the last letter of each line when read from top to bottom, spells out the rest of the message or additional word(s).

To me, one of the most important things in both the Acrostic and the Acrostic Plus, is that the poem makes sense. The form cannot overrun the meaning. I suppose that’s the case with any form of poetry.



Image credits:

First image: Photo by Anton Repponen on Unsplash
Second image: Photo by Karina Vorozheeva on Unsplash
Third image: Photo by __ drz __ on Unsplash


Rain Sings Lullaby – An Alouette Poem


Where did heart’s hope go?
Rain sings lullaby
Drowning with nature’s sorrow
Is the future lost?
Like lovers star-crossed
No faraway tomorrow

Hope’s an empty cage
Heaven thunder rage
Cascading tears from the sky
Earth still has power
Closing in each hour
Rain sings mourning lullaby

©RedCat


Written to the image at Sunday Muse. And heavily affected by feelings related to the latest IPCC report

This is a new form for me, the Alouette. I recently read this delightful poem at Tao Talk, which in turn was inspired by a poem by Shay. I frankly love how the writing community inspires and teaches by passing the lore of poetry from one person to the other. 

The Alouette has a meter of 5,5,7,5,5,7. And a rhyme scheme of a,a,b,c,c,b.



Also shared with earthweal open link weekend.


Image credits:

First image: Prompt photo from The Sunday Muse.

Second image: Photo by michael podger on Unsplash

Third image: Photo by Ruslan Zh on Unsplash


Reading [don’t tell me you’re only visiting] by Tan Ruey Fern


“Today, I am sharing an audio recording of a remarkable poem by Tan Ruey Fern of Carboniferous Chronicles. This poem is included in The Anthropocene Hymnal. I love the unusual vocabulary, sing-song rhythm and hints at rhyme to call out the malign forces that seek to destroy the earth:”

~Experiments in Fiction (original post)
[don’t tell me you’re only visiting] read by Tan Ruey Fern

The Anthropocene Hymnal is out now on Amazon!
All proceeds to WWF.

Image by BTS-BotrosTravelSolutions from Pixabay

Reading: ‘Tea Time’ by Tricia Sankey


Next in the series of readings from The Anthropocene Hymnal, is an audio recording of Tricia reading her poem, ‘Tea Time:’


Tricia Sankey

Tricia Sankey has traveled the United States as an Army wife while blogging her poetry and flash fiction. She managed to obtain an MFA in Writing from Lindenwood University along the way and enjoys tweeting her micropoetry on twitter @triciasankey. Her poetry has been published on sites such as Red Wolf Journal. Her short stories have placed in contests, most notably an Honorable Mention in the L. Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future Contest.

https://milspouseprose.com/


Again I have to say how proud I am to have to contributed to The Anthropocene Hymnal.
I hear the editor is very happy with the first week’s sales, charity donations and reviews!

If you like what you read, please remember to spread the word:

The Anthropocene Hymnal is out now on Amazon!
All proceeds to WWF.

You can read the original post at Experiments in Fiction.

The Longhouse Stands Empty And Forlorn


The big longhouse stands empty and forlorn
Where has time the Goddess and her fallen souls borne
No smoke comes from the thick roof thatch
Only the high pitched call of a Nuthatch
No murmur of voices or happy drinking songs
Fields lying fallow all year long
Cold and ashy stand the hearth
When did Freya and the Æsirs depart?

They didn’t go when we embraced Christ
They just hid in the stories of folklore
Maybe they tired when we our given paradise for convenience sake sacrificed
When we all connections to the Earth that birthed us forswore

The big longhouse stands empty and forlorn
The sight setting a heart to mourn
No smoke comes from the thick roof thatch
Are our hopes dashed?
No murmur of voices or happy drinking songs
Leaving a distinct feeling of wrong
Cold and ashy stand the hearth
Is that the end for our Earth?

©RedCat


Written for tonight’s Poetics: Outside Looking In at dVerse, where we’re urged to “be voyeurs, peeping through windows and doors of a house”. I had another idea originally but my muse refused to be led anywhere but to this place.



All three images are of the reconstructed Iron Age longhouse in Körunda, Nynäshamns County from Wikimedia Commons.


Reading: Blood-drop in Israel by Ellie Onka


I am excited to present this video of Ellie Onka reading her poem ‘Blood-drop in Israel’ from The Anthropocene Hymnal:

Blood-drop in Israel by Ellie Onka

Ellie Onka

Ellie Onka has been writing poetry consistently since early 2017 and is constantly inspired by poets like Sylvia Plath, Robert Frost, E.E. Cummings, Ted Hughes, and Leonard Cohen. Onka has publications that appear in Variant Literature Magazine, Visual Verse Anthology, the Scarlet Leaf Review, and Ephemeral Elegies among others, and can be found in different writing projects such as poetry or novel collaborations. She has many cats that consider her crazy, and when she’s not writing, she is losing sleep over it.

https://lucysworks.com/


Featured image is by Valdis Stakle.


The Anthropocene Hymnal is out now on Amazon!
All proceeds to WWF.

You can read the original post at Experiments in Fiction.

Human Missconceptions (2020 Re-post)

Art by helldivo at DeviantArt 

We see trees to fell

We fail to hear the stories a forest can tell

Timber to count

Of life giving life, until we come Gaia’s fount

Land to clear

Rebirth and renewal every year

Fields to sow

How nature nothing away throws

We see nature as something to tame

Our beloved planet will never be the same

We must learn, or live in man made hell
Teach each other to hard challenges surmount
Learn to hold our only planet dear
Accept that to some laws of nature we must bow
Because if Earth dies beneath our feet, we only got ourselves to blame

© RedCat


Re-post comment:

Nearly a year on I wish I could say we have taken strides to change our behavior. To remind us all this becomes this week’s archive poem.

In The Anthropocene Hymnal we share poetry about our slow sleepwalk into Armageddon.



Inspiered by the beautiful artwork shared by The Sunday Muse.

Also posted to Writers’ Pantry #34 at Poets and Storytellers United.

Source

Reading: ‘Destiny of this earth’ by Gabriela Marie Milton


To mark the publication of The Anthropocene Hymnal, Ingrid present her reading of ‘Destiny of this earth’ by Gabriela Marie Milton, which is included in the anthology.

Over the next few weeks, many of the poets from the anthology will be featured, so you can get to know a bit more about them, and their contributions to the book.

I am truly grateful for being able to contribute poems and share these readings of the project.

This poem is so true and touching it brings tears to my eyes.

“Destiny of this earth, you are my destiny too.”

From Destiny of this Earth by Gabriela Marie Milton

Reading: ‘Destiny of this earth’ by Gabriela Marie Milton

Gabriela Marie Milton

Gabriela Marie Milton is an internationally published author. Her literary work appeared in various magazines and anthologies. Under the pen name Gabriela M she was awarded 2019 Author of the Year at Spillwords Press (NYC). Her piece If I say I love you was nominated for 2020 Spillwords Press Publication of the Year (Poetic).  She is the author of Passions: Love Poems and Other Writings published by Vita Brevis Press in April 2020. 

Her new collection of poetry, Woman: Splendor and Sorrow will be published by Vita Brevis Press on July 31, 2021. 

https://shortprose.blog/


The Anthropocene Hymnal is out now on Amazon!
All proceeds to WWF.

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