Human Missconceptions (2020 Re-post)

Art by helldivo at DeviantArt 

We see trees to fell

We fail to hear the stories a forest can tell

Timber to count

Of life giving life, until we come Gaia’s fount

Land to clear

Rebirth and renewal every year

Fields to sow

How nature nothing away throws

We see nature as something to tame

Our beloved planet will never be the same

We must learn, or live in man made hell
Teach each other to hard challenges surmount
Learn to hold our only planet dear
Accept that to some laws of nature we must bow
Because if Earth dies beneath our feet, we only got ourselves to blame

© RedCat


Re-post comment:

Nearly a year on I wish I could say we have taken strides to change our behavior. To remind us all this becomes this week’s archive poem.

In The Anthropocene Hymnal we share poetry about our slow sleepwalk into Armageddon.



Inspiered by the beautiful artwork shared by The Sunday Muse.

Also posted to Writers’ Pantry #34 at Poets and Storytellers United.

Source

New Growth – After “Roots” by Frida Kahlo

“Roots” 1943 by Frida Kahlo

A glimmer of hope and faith
Let’s seeds of hope germinate
Growing tender shoots
Sending out questing roots
Searching for purchase in the arid plain
Watered by tears of grief and pain


Growing stronger each day
As the soul realizes she may
Free the muses to let creativity flow
Allow faith in budding ability to grow
Trust in the Goddess boon
Receive nourishment from sun and moon


Evolve according to the season
Follow the heart’s bright beacon
Until passion sings in the blood
Flowing freely, transforming the lifeless mud
Into rich and fertile earth
Where a scarred soul might find rebirth

©RedCat


Inspired by “Roots” by Frida Kahlo and written for this week’s Sunday Muse.

I’m so happy to get a chance to write to an artist whose artwork and life story has always inspired me greatly.

Also shared with the Writers’ Pantry at Poets and Storytellers United, and Promote Yourself Monday at Go Dog Go Café.


Photo credits in descending order

Photo by Russ Ward on Unsplash

Photo by Christian Joudrey on Unsplash

August Approaches – A Puente Poem


As August approaches,

in a golden sweltering haze

Impostor-syndrom encroaches,

trapping in this self-loathing maze

I’ve lived here for ages,

familiar with its confounding ways

Seen my dreams turn to ashes,

evaporate as hopelessness blaze

~ I’ve made new choices,

now can I the changes face ~

As August approaches,

in golden sweltering haze

Thoughts of breaking free encroaches,

I have to burn this thorny self-doubt gorse maze

Learn and evolve as I ages,

find new self-caring and nurturing ways

I will rise from the ashes,

remade by this creative blaze

©RedCat

Flowers Hermitage in Winter from Wikimedia Commons

I should be asleep, but can’t because all thoughts swirling. Realized after reading others poetry, that writing the turmoil out probably where a better way than watching tv.

So sat by candlelight, watching the moon and poured it on paper.

Written for First Line Friday over at Mindlovemisery Menagerie.


Stechginster Blaetter from Wikimedia Commons

As I Reap The Dreams That I Have Sown – A Harvest Song


There’s thunder in the sky,
the sickle flashes by.
As I hurry to cut down the corn.

I reap with a happy sigh,
as swift swallows fly.
The field must be done by Sunday morn.

I’ve struggled and hoped,
clinging to a frayed rope.
Until roots took hold, new futures were born.
Now I’ve got to be bold, leave behind what I’ve been told.

Forget about the lonely tears I weeped.
As I reap the dreams that I have sown.

The harvest moon glow,
when I life changes sow.
As I sing beneath the sickle moon.

I’ll rise above my woes,
when the change of seasons blows.
As I dance scy-clad to her freeing tune.

Forget about the lonely tears I weeped.
As I reap the dreams that I have sown.

I’ve sown the seeds,
that my soul will free.
Time to harvest them just like the corn.

I’ve learnt to know my needs,
to my muses feed.
Now let creativity my life adorn.

I’ve struggled and hoped,
clinging to a frayed rope.
Until roots took hold, new futures were born.
Now I’ve got to be bold, leave behind what I’ve been told.

Forget about the lonely tears I weeped.
As I reap the dreams that I have sown.

As I reap the dreams that I have sown.

©RedCat


Written for earthweal’s weekly challenge: LAMMAS. I was so inspired by the song in the prompt, a 14th century song about the death and rebirth of the barley crop (video below), that I had to write one of my own.

Of sowing and reaping, growing and weeping, of dreams becoming reality.


Steve Winwood singing “John Barleycorn must die” – a 14th century song about the death and rebirth of the barley crop

Photo credits:

Sickle moon – Photo by Mitchell Bowser on Unsplash

Corn Field – Photo by Nadine Redlich on Unsplash


Reading: ‘Destiny of this earth’ by Gabriela Marie Milton


To mark the publication of The Anthropocene Hymnal, Ingrid present her reading of ‘Destiny of this earth’ by Gabriela Marie Milton, which is included in the anthology.

Over the next few weeks, many of the poets from the anthology will be featured, so you can get to know a bit more about them, and their contributions to the book.

I am truly grateful for being able to contribute poems and share these readings of the project.

This poem is so true and touching it brings tears to my eyes.

“Destiny of this earth, you are my destiny too.”

From Destiny of this Earth by Gabriela Marie Milton

Reading: ‘Destiny of this earth’ by Gabriela Marie Milton

Gabriela Marie Milton

Gabriela Marie Milton is an internationally published author. Her literary work appeared in various magazines and anthologies. Under the pen name Gabriela M she was awarded 2019 Author of the Year at Spillwords Press (NYC). Her piece If I say I love you was nominated for 2020 Spillwords Press Publication of the Year (Poetic).  She is the author of Passions: Love Poems and Other Writings published by Vita Brevis Press in April 2020. 

Her new collection of poetry, Woman: Splendor and Sorrow will be published by Vita Brevis Press on July 31, 2021. 

https://shortprose.blog/


The Anthropocene Hymnal is out now on Amazon.

Sweet Summer Nights – A Monotetra Poem


Sweet-smelling summer night in June
Night is full of enchanted tunes
Ground with sparkling dewdrops is strewn
Magic of moon, magic of moon

The wind silvery giggles carries
Hiding among the blue posies
A dancing frolic of fairies
Wings like daisies, wings like daisies

In the pale midsummer night sky
Pink tinted clouds swiftly scuds by
We soar together you and I
As swallows fly, as swallows fly

The moon is full and shining bright
Bathing us in her blessed light
As we share in earthly delights
Sweet summer night, sweet summer night

©RedCat


Written for Poetry Form: Monotetra at dVerse. It’s always a fun challenge to try out a new form.

 The monotetra is a poetic form developed by Michael Walker. Here are the basic rules:

*Comprised of quatrains (four-line stanzas) in tetrameter (four metrical feet) for a total of 8 syllables per line

*Each quatrain consists of mono-rhymed lines (so each line in the first stanza has the same type of rhyme, as does each line in the second stanza, etc.)

*The final line of each stanza repeats the same four syllables. This is what makes the monotetra so powerful as a poetic form – the last line contains two metrical feet, repeated.

*This poem can be as short as 1 or 2 quatrains and as long as a poet wishes.

Stanza Structure:

Line 1: 8 syllables; A1

Line 2: 8 syllables; A2

Line 3: 8 syllables; A3

Line 4: 4 syllables, repeated; A4, A4

Source

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